TCP October 2021

On the first Monday of every month, we meet on Zoom to discuss transatlantic and global issues. The idea is that even though we are in different places geographically and personally, we exchange ideas, learn from each other, and grow more and more into a part of an understanding global society.
In October, we discussed the topic of money, as it stood out to us as one of four definitive prerequisites for state sovereignty. Among other things, we were interested in the questions of what money is, where money comes from, and why societies and states need money. As is often the case, we were only able to scratch the surface of the topic, but we still managed to examine a few myths and ideas and learn from this exploration.

The following texts have helped us:

Mythos Geldknappheit | (Maurice Höfgen)

How Money is created by the central bank and the banking system | (Thomas J Jordan)

The money creation process: A theoretical and empirical analysis for the United States | (Matteo Deleidi and Enrico Sergio Levrero)

The Forms and Functions of Money | (John Vaz, Alistair Milne and Kym Brown)

The State: Past, Present, Future | (Bob Jessop)

TCP September 2021

On the first Monday of every month, we meet on Zoom to discuss transatlantic and global issues. The idea is that even though we are in different places geographically and personally, we exchange ideas, learn from each other, and grow more and more into a part of an understanding global society.

In September, we began our mini-series on states by talking about the most established form of large-scale social organization: states. We looked at what states offer, where limitations need to be, and what else would be required. We also stumbled upon the following thesis: That state sovereignty requires violence, law, money, and knowledge. This laid the groundwork for the next four months as well.

We found the mentioned thesis and other inspirations in the following texts:

Why Nations Fail – The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty | (Daron Acemoglu/James A. Robinson)

The demise of the nation state | The Guardian (Rana Dasgupta)

What is a State Constitution? | (James A. Gardner)

The Idea of the State | (Haskell Fain)
The State: Past, Present, Future | (Bob Jessop)

States, state power, and state theory | (Bob Jessop)

What is a State if it is not a Sovereign? | (Clifford Geertz)

TCP August 2021

In August, our conversation revolved around the topic of philanthropy. We wanted to find out what we understand by philanthropy and how we want to see it in our society. Various texts led us to relevant questions and aspects. Philanthropy has different forms and focuses and goes in countless directions around the world. Therefore, it is crucial to know and understand the meaning and concept of philanthropy a little better. 

The very insightful texts were:

On the Modern Meaning of Philanthropy | (Marty Sulek)

Introduction: The Ethics of Philanthropy | (Patricia Illingworth and Thomas Pogge)

There’s No Such Thing as Good Philanthropy | Jacobin (Daniel Bessner)

“Generous” Billionaires Are Part of the Problem | Jacobin (Luke Savage)

Philanthropic Foundations and Development Co-operation | (OECD)

Promoting Philanthropy: Global Challenges and Approaches | INSP (Paula D. Johnson, Stephen P. Johnson, Andrew Kingman)

TCP July 2021

In July we talked about Migration. A phenomenon that for thousands of years human kind is experiencing. However, societies today and in the more recent past have discussed and dealt with migration from different angels. Even though the conversation is some months in the past, the topic is always relevant and just now has been once again up in the top of European news. We try to understand the discussion and found help in the following texts:

Anti-immigration, like pro-immigration, is a legitimate political position | The Economist (Yuval Noah Harari)

Migrants on the Front Lines of Global Class War | Jacobin (Hilary Goodfriend)

On Migrants Rights, Joe Biden Still Has a Long Way to Go | Jacobin (Adam Goodman)

How Deportation Became the Core of Europe’s Migration Policy | Jacobin (Daiva Repečkaitė)

Journeys of hope: what will migration routes into Europe look like in 2021? | Guardian (Lorenzo Tondo)

Covid-19 crisis puts migration and progress on integration at risk | (OECD)

TCP June 2021

In June, we discussed the topic of “Bidenomics”. The new government has gotten off to a flying start and launched many projects. Government investment is playing a new role. With a lot of money being invested, this is a departure from Reagen’s austerity ideology of years past (which began under Jimmy Carter). Perhaps it will be an example of how to tackle the big problems of the present and the future. Short time ago we have seen the political battles over the implementation of the infrastructure bill.

As always we were guided through the discussion by some texts that we discover after a brief and relatively random research, these were our references:

America’s race to net zero | New Statesman (Adam Tooze)

The Infrastructure Bill Is a Chance to Make Our Public Spaces Beautiful | Jacobin (Firmin DeBrabander)

Biden Can GoBigger and Not “pay for It” the Old Way | The New York Times (Stephanie Kelton)

Bidenomics, explained | (Noah Smith)

TCP March 21

This month we talked about democracy and about developments in regard to hegemony. Moreover we spoke about possible ways of a strengthened cooperation.References:

The American Abyss – The New York Times (Timothy Snyder)

The Obama Reunion Isn’t Nearly Enough to Stave Off Catastrophe – The New Republic (Kate Aronoff)

Should America still Police the World – The New Yorker (Daniel Immerwahr)

TCP May 2021

In May we talked about the “pursuit of happiness”. Hence, we were once again inspired by the US Constitution. Moreover, happiness is often regarded as everybody’s daily objective and the “pursuit of happiness” has been part of international pop-culture for a long time. Therefore, we would like to discuss our perspectives on happiness in our personal life but also what happiness means for a society, especially if ones most prominent legal document constitutes happiness as a major goal and human right. 

As always we were guided through the discussion by some texts that we discover after a brief and relatively random research, these were our references:

Hannah Arendt on Action and the Pursuit of Happiness | Brain Pickings (Maria Popova)

Our ‘Pursuit of Happiness’ Is Killing the Planet | The New York Times (James Traub)

The Lost Meaning of The Pursuit of Happiness (Arthur M. Schlesinger)

The Pursuit of Happiness: What the Founders Meant –And Didn’t | The Atlantic (Kathleen Kennedy Townsend)

Were we happier in the stone age? | The Guardian (Yuval Noah Harari)

What the Declaration of Independence really means by ‘pursuit of happiness’ | Emory University

TCP April 2021

In April, we discussed the broad topic of liberty and tried to understand it a little better. Liberty is one of the cornerstones of the U.S. Constitution and, moreover, one of the core values that people around the world aspire to. However, there are so many different understandings of what liberty might be. Therefore, we needed some guidance and by chance and a brief research, the following texts served as our references:

What is Freedom?  (Hannah Arendt)

Yours, Mine and Ours – Property Rights and Individual Liberty (Chesney C. Ryan)

Left and Right – the Prospects for Liberty (Murray N. Rothbard)

The Idea of “Freedom” has two Different Meanings – Here’s Why (Annelien De Dijn)

A warm welcome to TCP

A short and warm welcome to our Transatlantic Conversation Podcast.   On the first Monday of every month, we meet on Zoom to discuss transatlantic and global issues. The idea is that even though we are in different places geographically and personally, we exchange ideas, learn from each other, and grow more and more into […]